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Legal research

A total of 32 records were found for Legal research
Definition: The process of investigating the background to a legal issue or case, including legislation, case law, and legal definitions. Included here are resources about how to do legal research such as research guides, services that assist with such research, and basic research tools such as dictionaries.

For sources of legislation, see Legislative materials; for sources of case law see Courts and court judgments.

At LInC, a professional staff member will help you understand Alberta's court processes for both civil and criminal matters. This includes information about court procedures and forms and steps to take in making legal applications. The web page includes locations for walk-in service and a web form for submitting a question. Or you can phone: Calgary 403-476-4744; Edmonton 780-644-8217; Red Deer 403-755-1469; Grande Prairie 780-833-4234.

Related keywords: Legal research

This tipsheet give an outline of how to tell if the legal information you are looking at is jurisdictionally correct, up-to-date, and provided by a reliable source,

Related keywords: Legal research, Self-representation

Learn the importance of developing a good search strategy in order to quickly and effectively answer legal questions. This web page is the starting point for the University of Ottawa learning modules about legal research. Topics include: searching using keywords and Boolean logic, secondary sources, legal journals, case law, using CanLII, federal legislation, and legal citations. University of Ottawa.
Related keywords: Legal process, Legal research, Legislative materials, Self-representation

The National Self-Represented Litigants Project (NSRLP) is committed to advancing understanding of the challenges and hard choices facing the very large numbers of Canadians who come to court without counsel. The Project works to promote dialogue and collaboration among all those affected by the self-represented litigant phenomenon, both justice system professionals and litigants themselves. They publish resources designed specifically for SRLs, as well as research reports that examine the implications for the justice system.
Related keywords: Legal process, Legal research

Alberta Resources

From the Great Library of the Law Society of Upper Canada, this web page provides annotated links to case law as well as case-related services and information available mainly on the websites of Alberta courts and administrative tribunals. 

Related keywords: Administration of justice, Courts and court judgments, Legal research, Legislative materials

The University of Calgary,  Faculty of Law's Public Interest Law Clinic  will provide pro bono legal services to clients, facilitating access to justice and providing law students with experiential learning opportunities. Law students will work in the clinic on precedent-setting cases affecting Alberta's vulnerable communities and the environment, allowing them to learn public interest advocacy and litigation skills. The Clinics focus is on provide access to justice for the province's vulnerable and voiceless communities, specifically in the areas of public health, human rights, equality and environmental law,"  Groups seeking access to justice on an issue affecting Albertans can reach the Public Interest Law Clinic by contacting Molly Naber-Sykes at (403) 220-4814 or by email for more information

Related keywords: Advocacy, Charter of Rights, General health law and policy, Human rights, Legal research

This guide has been designed as a starting point for those seeking self-help materials and background information on various legal topics. The guide brings together a number of useful links to web-based resources, along with spotlighting some of the self-help print publications in our collection. The links and information are not intended to be a comprehensive listing. This guide is not meant to be a substitute for professional legal assistance.

Have a look at the topics on the tabs, or try the list below for helpful websites for getting started on your research.  

Related keywords: Legal research, Self-representation

Canada/Federal

This online resource is written and maintained by Catherine Best, a research lawyer with Boughton Law Corporation in Vancouver, British Columbia, and former Director of Legal Research and Writing at the UBC Faculty of Law. It features information on research essentials (strategy, methods and writing), electronic research (using free and commercial services), and statutory and jurisdiction research.

Related keywords: Legal research

The objective of the Dictionary, which was produced as part of the process of standardizing French common law vocabulary, is essentially to expand the use of uniform terminological solutions. More specifically, the Dictionary is intended to provide methods of expressing concepts that are unique to the common law, using French terms that are consistent not only with the conceptual framework of that system of law, but also with the demands of the French language, and to establish a legal language that is precise and suited to the needs of French-speaking common law professionals.

Related keywords: Legal research

Subtitle: Legal Research Principles and CanLII Navigation for Self-Represented Litigants. This publication from the National Self-Represented Litigants Project is a guide to the use of the freely available online database of case law and legislation from the Canadian Legal Information Institute (CanLII). The guide also provides an introduction to the Canadian legal system and the process of legal research. This PDF (48 pages, 2015) is available for free download.

Related keywords: Legal research, Self-representation

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