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Self-representation

A total of 55 records were found for Self-representation
Definition:

Acting on one's own behalf in court, without the assistance of a lawyer or other advocate.


CPLEA has created new resources on Family Law in Alberta in partnership with the Edmonton Community Legal Centre. The five booklets in the series provide practical legal information on Child Custody and ParentingFinancial SupportProperty Division, Representing Yourself in Family Court, and Young Parents. The booklets provide information for both married and unmarried couples.  The booklets can be downloaded for free at www.cplea.ca/publications. Select Family Law from the drop down menu.

Related keywords: Child support, Common law relationships, Custody and access, Divorce and separation, Family law general resources, Guardianship and trusteeship, Self-representation

Ann Sherman presented her research on self represented litigants, entitled "A Study of Self Represented Litigants in the Supreme Court of Prince Edward Island" at CLIA's 2008 Annual General Meeting. The executive summary is posted and the full report is available in PDF format.
Related keywords: Research reports and institutes, Self-representation

The Limited Legal Services Project is about helping lawyers provide more limited legal services to more clients, and about letting people who might not otherwise be able to hire a lawyer know that other options are available. Check out their Guide for Clients which is intended to help clients understand the legal service options available, and whether limited legal services are right for you. The site also provides a listing of Alberta lawyers participating in the Limited Legal Services Project.  

Related keywords: Lawyers, Legal services, Self-representation

The Association of Translators and Interpreters of Alberta ) is the only association of certified translators, court interpreters, and conference interpreters in the province of Alberta. The Association was founded in 1979 and is the only member for Alberta of the Canadian Translators, Terminologists and Interpreters Council (CTTIC). Through the CTTIC, the Association is affiliated with the International Federation of Translators (FIT). The primary aim of ATIA is to meet the needs of clients by ensuring, through its standards and certification procedures, that their interests are protected, and by facilitating their contacts with professional translators and interpreters.

Related keywords: Legal process, Legal services, Self-representation

  Report published was by Department of Justice Canada in 2003. It provides information on the extend of self-representation, the impacts on the acccused, and means of improving the access to information for self-represented litigants. Data collected from 9 court sites, including Edmonton (PDF - 51 pages).  Related keywords: Research reports and institutes (75)

 

Related keywords: Research reports and institutes, Self-representation

LawNow is a bi-monthly digital public legal education magazine which has been  published by the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta for almost 40 years.  Its articles  and columns are written in plain language and take a practical look at how the law relates to the every day lives of Canadians.In each issue, LawNow’s family law column takes a look at a specific topic in this area of law and explains it clearly and concisely.

Related keywords: Child support, Common law relationships, Custody and access, Family law general resources, Marriage, Self-representation, Spousal support

This tipsheet give an outline of how to tell if the legal information you are looking at is jurisdictionally correct, up-to-date, and provided by a reliable source,

Related keywords: Legal research, Self-representation

This tipsheet is a publication of the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta. It looks at the key differences between providing legal information vs. legal advice.

Related keywords: Self-representation

Learn the importance of developing a good search strategy in order to quickly and effectively answer legal questions. This web page is the starting point for the University of Ottawa learning modules about legal research. Topics include: searching using keywords and Boolean logic, secondary sources, legal journals, case law, using CanLII, federal legislation, and legal citations. University of Ottawa.
Related keywords: Legal process, Legal research, Legislative materials, Self-representation

This pamphlet from the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta explains some basic points about the Alberta Rules of Court. It may assist you if: you have a legal problem and are looking at your options; you are deciding whether to hire a lawyer or represent yourself; you are already representing yourself; or you have questions for your lawyer about the court process. The Alberta Rules of Court apply to the Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta. They do not apply in Provincial Court (Small Claims Court). This 2 page full-colour PDF is available for free download.

Related keywords: Civil actions, Legal process, Self-representation

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